Making Connections

Building Relationships

Saturday morning was a rainy gloomy day. We took our morning to relax, unwind and do some laundry.

In the afternoon was our last shift together.  In the coming week, we will be mixed up with the other woman who came to serve. We are excited to get to know all of them even more! (We have enjoyed our nights socializing in the apartment, laughing and talking and even going out on late night bear hunts!)

After we started our shift in the afternoon at the net, it got really busy fast! We enjoyed making cookies, socializing, and handing out books and quilts. Parts of the afternoon were really challenging for us because so many bus loads of people are coming in from all over the world. With so many different languages, it was hard for us to have a conversation with them.

One of the men who is part of the VBS team arranged for a group of people to play music at Sunday morning service. So, Deb and Sean left to go practice for Sunday worship. Later that evening a couple from Hilltop Christian invited our team over.  She invited us over for some traditional ice cream called agutuck (a-goo-tic). This is “Alaskan ice cream” made from blueberries, salmon berries, raspberries, sugar, and crisco-(if you don’t have whale blubber on hand).  She showed us around her house. She showed us many different things she has made or collected through the years.

One of the most fascinating to us was the furs that they had tanned to make parkas. She showed us the way that she hand-stitched the furs together. Then she took us into another room and showed us all of the different parkas that she has made for her family.  Then they invited us to eat.  They were so kind to let us try different kinds of moose sausage, salmon spread, and the ice cream. We were able to ask some things about Naknek and other parts of Alaska. This was just a super time of fellowship with local believers.

Father’s Day

Sunday was Father’s day! We were sad not to be there to celebrate with everyone back home but we celebrated here in another part of the country!  Sunday morning a few of the women got up early to start on a pancake breakfast for all of the congregation in celebration of Father’s day. This was a great time of fellowship with all of the people we have gotten to know over the last week or so. They served pancakes, sausage, eggs, fruit, and rhubarb crumble (to die for). In between the breakfast and the service Pastor Jeff and a few of the men on our team went to some of the local canneries to pick up some of the workers for church. Debbie got to play keyboard in a little worship band with a harmonica, guitar, piano and accordion!

An International Experience

The church was just packed with people from different states in the U.S., also from Nicaragua, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Costa Rica, and more. The best part was that a man named Darcy translated Pastor Jeff’s whole sermon into Spanish. It’s amazing to see the different cultures coming together to worship the same God.

Baking, Evangelizing, Praying

Monday was the first day that we worked different shifts.  Caeley worked the morning shift. We had to open the Net early because there was people already lined up outside to come in! It was stormy so we gave them some place dry so that they were comfortable.

The morning consisted of much baking to keep up with the needs of the people coming through.  Debbie worked Monday evening shift.  It was very busy again.  Again a LOT of baking.  Most of the people are using the internet to connect with home, eating cookies and drinking a lot of cocoa today in the rain!  There are many people that love for you to just sit and talk with them.  One of the men that has worked at the Net before said that the best way to start a conversation with anyone is to ask if you can see the pictures of their family at home.  This opens up conversations where we can share about Jesus.  So many are searching here!

One man said to Deb that afternoon “Sister, Sister, come here.”  And he went to the back room where the clothes are.  Thinking he needed clothes, I asked if I could get a bag for him.  He grabbed my hands and asked me to pray please, right now, for temptations that are all around him.  So we prayed.

– Caeley and Deb

Loving the Locale and the Locals

Work, Locals, and Beauty

Wednesday Morning was our last morning working at The Net together. Thursday-Saturday we will be working the afternoon shift which is 2-8 P.M. Wednesday Morning we had to say goodbye to a local named Richard. He is moving to Palmer, Alaska with his wife. We definitely did not want him to leave and he did not want to say goodbye either. We have learned a lot from the locals. Mostly about fishing of course, but also about their life stories, their walk with God, and history of the town. Wednesday night, Sean and Caeley convinced Deb to stay up for the sunset. Of course, here the sun does not set until about 11:40.
This was a challenge for Deb because she is not much of a night owl!  But we made it. We went out at about 10:45 and started to search for bears. After seeing none, we decided to make our way to the bay and get ready for the sunset. It was worth the late night because that was one of the most beautiful things that we have ever seen. Since Thursday was the day we started working afternoons, we had the morning to do as we wish. Lacey, Jeremy, and their son Malachi decided to go to the beach and invited us to go along. Before we went to the beach we made a pit stop at a local coffee shop called Shearwater. It was one of the cutest coffee shops that we have ever been to. It overlooked the bay and they provided some binoculars so we were able to see everything closer.
Afterwards, we strolled along the beach for awhile. As we walked, we came upon some bald eagles. One even flew right over our heads! We also learned the little sheds on the shorelines are where some of the fishermen dock and stay when they are out fishing. How interesting. After lunch and a little cleaning up we were headed to the Net for our first afternoon shift. It was really different walking in and not seeing the normal locals that come in the morning. The shift started off slow, but started to pick up. We were able to have some good conversations with some of the fishermen and the cannery workers. We even had a younger group of people start up a scrabble game!

Planting Seeds of Love

The Net is a place where everyone is able to experience love. Love that people do not get when they are thousands of miles away from home. Love is a free cup of coffee and cookies, it’s the books and bibles that fill the shelves that they are able to take back to wherever they are going. It’s also in the free warm clothes, blankets and quilts given away. The hugs and prayers from the workers. Many seeds are planted even if we do not see it right away.
The people that come through never fail to thank us for the hospitality that we provide and the services that we offer. There is a huge need for this ministry here in Alaska, and that becomes more and more obvious every day. One thing that really breaks my heart though is to see those same people at night walking the roads heading for the bars to waste their nights away. Unfortunately, because we are so isolated here, there is not much else to do here for those people. Everyone is waiting for the salmon. They are waiting for their 16 hour days to begin. Friday morning, we woke up to the first rain that we have had here. With the rain comes quite a bit of rain too. We were able to sleep in especially with the gloomy weather. Friday our afternoon shift started a little bit earlier around 12:30. Today we only worked till 6 because we had a pizza party that evening with Pastor Jeff and Jane. This was one of the busiest shifts that we have worked so far.
Sean and Caeley were constantly baking trying to keep up with all of the goodies being eaten and trying to make sure they had some frozen cookies for the next morning to use. Debbie was talking to people and handing out quilts.
Keep us in your prayers!
-Caeley and Deb

On Mission in Alaska!

Safe & Sound . . . Groceries Too!

One of the things that surprised us as we came into Naknek was the towering stacks of refrigerated shipping containers! They are used by the canneries to ship the salmon.  For those of you that don’t know, we are here at this time because it is the salmon season.  That means this small town of 500 grows to several thousand people from around the world.  What an opportunity!  When we got to our apartment at KAKN radio station, we were excited and nervous to open our box and bag filled with the produce that you all helped us buy.  It had been quite the trip and we wondered how it had made it.  Helmar church donates quilts up here and sent a bag with us.  We used it to wrap the veggies and fruits.
Everything was good! And they were so excited to see the fresh produce.  Groceries up here must be shipped or flown in, usually and are very expensive.  (For ex.: a gallon of milk is about $10.).

Worship & Prayer

Sunday morning we enjoyed going to Hilltop Christian Church where Pastor Jeff Swanson is the pastor.
Then, after salmon for lunch (!), he and Pastor Jeremy Crowell (who is also the pilot here) invited 4 of us to go with for Sunday afternoon services in the remote village of Ekwok.  We flew in a Cherokee Six 300.  It was our first time in a small plane.  So EXCITING!
Pastor preached to a small group of natives, and Debbie was able to play keyboard for them – they usually sing with no musical accompaniment.
Sunday night when we came back to Naknek, we went to prayer service at Hilltop Christian.  When they asked for prayer requests, we were able to pray with them for Emily Holman Nash!

The Net

Monday morning, bright and early it was our turn to work at The Net.  The coffee house outreach program run by Hillside Christian Church.
The busy season has not begun yet, but ships are hiring and canneries are hiring, so crews are coming in.  After only 2 hours our first morning, we had met people from Anchorage, Miami, Costa Rica and the Czech Republic!
The coffee house needs to be ready for those coming in.  We serve coffee, hot chocolate, lemonade, and tea.  Also, we make cookies, brownies, and cupcakes etc.  One of the main things that we have seen bring people in, is the free internet.  The Internet is very, very expensive up here, and phone service is very hard to get!  Many times we hear Pastor, or someone, say. “We offer free coffee, free conversation, free books and Bibles to represent the best free gift — salvation through Jesus Christ!”
After our shift at the coffee house, we looked around Naknek and learned more about it.  Following supper—when The Net was closed for the day at 8:00— we helped Pastor Jeff and Jane paint the front steps of The Net.  We had plenty of time, the sun doesn’t set until 11:45 P.M.!!
Tuesday, we again were on the morning team at The Net.  We really enjoy visiting with the “locals” who come in each day to start out the morning.  One of the pastors gives a devotion and prayer to start the morning out.  If we are caught up in baking and there is plenty of coffee, etc., we can sit and play checkers or put together puzzles.

Adventures

After our shift, we volunteered to take the garbage to the dump outside of town.  Bears had been spotted there and they were hoping to see one.  Not this time!  But, later we saw the beach and a closer view of 2 of the canneries.  After supper, Pastor Jeff and Jane offered their 4-wheeler.  Caeley had a great time on the beach on the 4 wheeler with one of the other volunteers up here.  They saw a beautiful bald eagle.  Debbie enjoyed riding in the van with Jeff and Jane and seeing the same scenery.  Maybe the 4-wheeler next time!!
Thank you for all of the prayers! Keep them Coming! God Bless.
-Caeley & Deb

Serving

Right now is siesta time and that means a little down time for the staff members. With 62 kids, ages 4-12, there is very little time to have any quiet. Even late into the night there is noise. That is something that takes a lot to get used to. In order to keep the kids engaged, we have activity after activity from the time they wake up until the time they go to bed. (11:30pm!)

There have been many challenges this week. Some physical, some emotional, many spiritual. One of the staff members at dinner last night said to me over the excruciating decibels of clanking dishes and children laughing and chanting a silly song, “Could you imagine this camp without your team here?” I didn’t really think of our being here like it was helping the staff… I was only thinking about the children.

We are now on our second to last day of camp, and I can see the exhaustion on the faces of the campers and on the faces of the staff. We are all drained. There was a point when I felt as though I had nothing left, emotionally or physically. I looked at my phone to check the time and there was a message from my mom. “When Christ was tired of the crowds, he would always escape to spend time in prayer with His Father. That is where you will find your strength.” I replied “Your words from the Lord where a long drink to a weary worker.” I immediately turned in scripture to Matthew 14, just after Jesus feeds the 5000. Verse 22, he must have been so tired after serving so many people. Yet still he gave his disciples rest before himself. He stayed back to dismiss the crowd. He knew he needed to renew his strength by prayer to his Father. So he went to the mountain by himself to pray.

There is no doubt in my mind that we are here at Casa Berea for a purpose. There are 13 Spanish team members to 62 kids! If anything, us doing the dirty work of dishes and helping the little kids shower is a relief for these team members. Before coming here I thought we were here to love on the kids, but I have come to realize we are not here only to serve the kids, we are here to serve the Spanish team, so they can share the gospel and do their job of caring for these children. Yes, we play games with them, draw with them, or just laugh and try to talk to them in broken Spanish. But more importantly we work behind the scenes so the Spanish team  can share the gospel.

As we finish this week my prayer is that we remember Jesus’ sacrifice in his service of his people. He did not come to be served, but to serve (Matt. 20:28)

post by Rebecca Parini

 

 

12 Girls with Lice… What an experience

¡Hola amigos!

This is Olivia Nelson, coming to you live from España. It’s Tuesday, and I’ve been craving American food for about 4 days now. All I want is cold milk and more than bread for breakfast (for those of you who know me, you will never hear these words come out of my mouth again. I am a bread lover, but there’s only so much you can take). This trip has been full of unexpected tasks from staying up until at least 1:00 every night to picking lice out of 12 girls’ hair. It’s been a ride so far, but I can’t wait to see what the rest of the week brings.

Initially, I thought that I would be ok talking to the kids because I had taken 2 years of Spanish. Let me just say one thing: I. am. lost. There’s so much more to a language than just a textbook. Their accent is different in Spain compared to Mexico, where my Spanish teacher was from. It’s harder for me to understand what they are saying, and they seem to talk so fast here. All I can say is, I’m SO glad that we have translators here to help us with the kids. Most of the counselors know a little bit of English so that makes it easier to communicate with them.

Since the camp is only set up to sleep about 75 people, the girls from West Lisbon were lucky enough to get to sleep outside in tents! I was a little frustrated at first because I thought that the guys deserved to sleep in the tents. However, it turned out to be a blessing in disguise. As I mentioned above, 12, now 13, girls have lice at the camp. Instead of turning away the kids, some of the counselors do vinegar treatments every night for the girls. Lice is very common in Spain, so it’s not a big deal. The parents know they have them, but don’t have the time to deal with it. God works in mysterious, but great ways.

With only 2 days into the camp, my perspective on how much we take for granted in the United States has totally changed. Warm showers every day, eating whenever we want, air conditioning, and even good cell phone service. I will never take these things for granted again.

This is Olivia Nelson signing out. Have a great day and eat some steak for me. ¡Adios!

Recapturing the Great Commission: Part One

Great Commission

Exciting Opportunities at West Lisbon

We have an exciting two months ahead of us at West Lisbon Church in the area of World Missions. This Sunday evening, February 12th at 6pm, Mark and Stephanie Dodrill will be with us at Family Mission Fellowship to share about Youth for Christ’s work in Barcelona, Spain and about their home assignment. It is also exciting because West Lisbon is sending a team to work with Mark and Stephanie in Spain this summer! By the way, there is still one spot available on the Destination: Spain team.

Then in March, the Missions Committee will host our annual Missions Conference on March 18–19th. Our guest speaker for the weekend is Dr. Greg Parsons. Greg is the current Director of Global Connections at Frontier Ventures. Frontier describes itself in this way:

We are a community of dreamers and doers who long to see Jesus worshipped in the earth’s darkest corners.

Pretty awesome. Greg is also engaged in the leadership of the Perspectives on the World Christian Movement. If this guy doesn’t fan the flame of world missions in your soul . . . you may want to check your pulse!!

In light of all of these exciting learning and serving experiences before us, I thought that I would spend the next two Messenger articles on the Great Commission of Matthew 28:16–20. In this month’s edition, we’ll examine the setting of Jesus’ commission. Next month, we’ll take a look at the words of Jesus’ commission.

Matthew 28:16–17 (ESV)

Now the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain to which Jesus had directed them. And when they saw him they worshiped him, but some doubted.

The Setting of the Great Commission

“The Great Commission” as a title for Matthew 28:16–20 may have its origin in the first decade of the 1900s. It may have first appeared as a title for this text in the Scofield Reference Bible of 1909. Since then, it has enjoyed a place of prominence among the commissioning passages of the New Testament (e.g., Luke 24:44–49; Acts 1:8). Let’s take a look at the setting of the commission that precedes the words of the commission.

First, the people of the commission are described. The description of the group shocks the reader of Matthew’s commission passage. It is the “eleven.” The absence of one of the twelve recalls the evil and fall of Judas—one who had spent so much time with Jesus, betrayed him and was lost. We are soberly reminded by the word “eleven” that simply being present and in the crowd associated with Jesus does not correlate to genuine loyalty and discipleship. This does not mean—as some falsely presume—that the commission was ONLY for the eleven. Remember, Matthew wrote his Gospel with a Christian community in mind, who would receive and act upon his retelling of the life and work of Jesus Christ. The commission began with the eleven, but the text assumes that the church of all ages will take up this cause.

Second, the place of the commission is described. Jesus had told them that he himself would go ahead of them and meet them in Galilee after he was resurrected (Matthew 26:30–32; 28:10). After the Passover festival had finished, the disciples appeared to have returned home to Galilee to meet Jesus (see also John 20:26–21:14). As the time for his ascension drew near, it seems that they had returned to Jerusalem (Acts 1:1–11). Perhaps more significant, Matthew mentions that their meeting took place on “the mountain to which Jesus had directed them.” Mountaintop-experiences are an important theme in the Gospel of Matthew. Consider all that happened on mountains:

  • Temptation (4:8)
  • Teaching—Sermon on the Mount (5:1ff)
  • Prayer (14:23)
  • Healing (15:29)
  • Transfiguration (17:1, 9)
  • Triumphal Entry Prep (21:1)
  • Teaching—Olivet Discourse (24:3)

And now, Jesus calls his eleven disciples to the mountain for their commissioning.

Lastly, the faith of the commissioned is described. Notice that Matthew describes the presence of both worship AND doubt. It helps to explore this concept within Matthew’s gospel to find out what he means by this. For example, James seems to teach that there is a sense in which faith and doubt cannot coexist (e.g., 1:6–8). Jude, however, teaches us to be merciful to doubters (v. 22). Paul in Romans warns about doubts with regard to conscious and ethical decisions (14:23). So, context seems to be key. Clearly, doubt is a danger to the spiritual life if it persists, pervades, and is permanent; however, don’t we all struggle with some degree of doubt? I think this is where Matthew’s “theology” of doubt is helpful to us. Imagine the relationship of faith and doubt in Matthew’s gospel like a cup, where the empty space represents “Doubt” and the filled space represents “Faith”:


clipart of an almost empty glass of water

Throughout the Gospel of Matthew is what Grant Osborne calls the motif of “little faith.” Check out 6:30; 8:26; 14:31; 16:8. I tend to agree with Osborne that what is being described here in Matthew 28:17 by the concept of doubt in the midst of worship is simply another way of describing the theme of “little faith” that has been a regular description of Jesus’ disciples throughout the book. Put simply, their faith isn’t mature yet. They have faith, but it’s small. It is largely an immature faith at this point. The Holy Spirit and their witnessing will help to grow their faith, so that in time their faith may look something like this:

clipart of an almost empty glass of water

I’m not sure that doubt is ever totally eliminated from the spiritual life. James, Paul, and Jude exhort us about doubt for exactly this reason. However, I do think that faith and trust in God grows throughout the spiritual life. But come back with me to the setting of Jesus’ commissioning in Matthew 28:17. Is it really possible that the resurrected Jesus is about to entrust the expansion of his kingdom and the establishment of his church to eleven or so worshippers who are having doubts? Well, that’s certainly what the text says, isn’t it?

What does that mean for you? Have you been thinking that all of your doubts have to be gone before you effectively serve Jesus? Do you feel that you have to possess all of the answers before you can be sent to make disciples? Jesus certainly didn’t expect this of his original eleven. Why do you think he expects it of you? Fellow Christian, don’t allow your “little faith” to cause you to do “little disciple-making.” As we see in the book of Acts, the experience of the Holy Spirit’s ministry as we witness and make disciples increases our faith. Part of the excitement and fun of making disciples is becoming learners of Jesus together. I hope you’ll put your little faith to work in the Great Commission. Go on; step out of the boat and into the Great Commission! Next time, we’ll see that Jesus tells us everything our little faith needs to thrive in Christ’s commission.